Most Americans Say Coronavirus Outbreak Has Impacted Their Lives, Pew Survey Reports

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As the number of confirmed COVID-19 cases continues to rise and schools, workplaces and public gathering spaces across the U.S. remain closed, a new Pew Research Center survey finds that the coronavirus outbreak is having profound impacts on the personal lives of Americans in a variety of ways. Nearly nine-in-ten U.S. adults say their life has changed at least a little as a result of the COVID-19 outbreak, including 44 percent who say their life has changed in a major way.

Amid widespread calls from experts for Americans to socially distance from one another to avoid spreading the virus, what recently seemed like mundane daily activities now elicit concerns from large swaths of the population. About nine-in-ten U.S. adults (91 percent say that, given the current situation, they would feel uncomfortable attending a crowded party. Roughly three-quarters (77 percent) would not want to eat out at a restaurant.

In the midst of a presidential election year, about two-thirds (66 percent) say they wouldn’t feel comfortable going to a polling place to vote. And smaller but still substantial shares express discomfort even with going to the grocery store (42 percent) or visiting with a close friend or family member in their home (38 percent).

How are people adapting their behavior in light of the outbreak? Four-in-ten working-age adults ages 18 to 64 report having worked from home because of coronavirus concerns—a figure that rises to a majority among working-age adults with college degrees and upper-income earners.

Click here to read the full story from Pew Research Center.

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