Making Amazon Prime Day Work for You

By Staff
Friday, July 12, 2019 1:02 PM NEW YORK—Amazon Prime Day is one of the biggest shopping days of the year, and it reaches far beyond just Amazon itself. According to Stackla, other businesses that run discounts and sales to coincide with Prime Day see a 40% increase in sales on average. That means leveraging Amazon Prime Day can be a great idea for any business owner, big or small, no matter what they sell. This year, Prime Day is a two-day event, running from July 15-16, so there's still time to get involved. Get the full story from Stackla to learn how to make Prime Day work for you and your business. 

Staying Prepared Through Hurricane Season

By Staff
Friday, July 12, 2019 9:52 AM NEW YORK⁠—As hurricane season kicks into high gear, millions of people around the world are preparing their homes for potentially life-altering storms. In addition to the standard hurricane prep, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has recently issued a reminder to Americans who use dialysis or other electrical powered medical equipment. For many people, inquiring about early treatments, packing extra medication and eyeglasses, charging medical equipment ahead of time, and taking care to throw out medication that could have been water damaged can save lives. For the full story on how to prepare medically for hurricane season, visit HHS.gov.

Skull Found In Greek Cave May Be the Oldest Outside Africa

By Staff
Thursday, July 11, 2019 5:30 PM According to AFP News Agency, a 210,000-year-old skull found in Greece has been identified as the oldest human remains outside of Africa. The skull is one of two that were discovered in a Greek cave in the 1970s, AFP reports. Scientists were able to use computer modelling and uranium dating to re-examine the two skulls recently. Until now, Homo sapiens were thought to have first arrived in Europe only around 50,000 years ago. However, this discovery may push back the date of human arrival in Europe, and change the way we understand the development and migrations of the human species. For the full story, visit AFP news.

What You Should Know About Swimming and Your Eyes

By Staff
Wednesday, July 10, 2019 1:26 PM Whether you enjoy a leisurely dip in a hotel pool or compete in the Olympic 200 meter freestyle, you may be familiar with the stinging, burning and redness of “swimmer’s eye.” While swimming is a great form of exercise and a relaxing way to cool down, it can be hard on your eyes. A thin layer of tears called the tear film coats the surface of our eyes. This tear film keeps our eyes moist, smooth and clear. Chlorine and other chemicals used to keep pool water clean can wash away the moist layer of tear film, leaving eyes uncomfortable and red. Read about 5 ways to keep your eyes healthy while swimming in this feature from the American Academy of Ophthalmology.

The Big Number: 2 Hours a Week Outdoors Suggested for Better Health

By Staff
Tuesday, July 9, 2019 9:00 AM If you’re looking for simple steps to a healthier mind and body, consider taking those steps outdoors. New research finds that people who spend at least two hours a week in a natural environment—like parks, beaches, woodlands or urban green spaces—are more likely to have better physical health and psychological well-being than those who do not venture into the great outdoors. The findings, which included 59 percent improved odds for overall good health and 23 percent better odds of psychological well-being, were based on data from a nationally representative sample of 19,806 British adults, published in the journal Scientific Reports. Click here to read the full report in The Washington Post.

USWNT Brings Home Gold, But Their Fight Has Just Begun

By Staff
Monday, July 8, 2019 9:39 AM On Sunday, The U.S. Women's National Soccer Team defeated The Netherlands 2 - 0 to win their second consecutive, and fourth total, Women's World Cup. With this win, The United States has won more Women's World Cups than any other nation. As the USWNT stood on the pitch to take photos with their trophy, one particular chant rung out through the stadium: "Equal pay! Equal pay!"

Chess Piece Found in Drawer Worth Nearly $1 Million

By Staff
Wednesday, July 3, 2019 10:11 AM In 1831, 93 chess pieces, mostly carved from walrus ivory, were discovered on Scotland's remote Isle of Lewis. The chess pieces have been shrouded in mystery since their discovery, with most historians believing that they were carved between the late 12th and early 13th centuries in Norway. The chess set was missing five pieces when it was discovered⁠—but it turns out, one of the missing pieces had been sitting in a family home for decades.  

A Warm Weather Reminder About Kids, Pets, and Hot Cars

By Staff
Tuesday, July 2, 2019 12:08 PM With weather warming up quickly in the Northern Hemisphere, the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services is issuing an important reminder not to leave children or pets in hot cars, even just for a minute. According to HHS.gov, temperatures inside a car can rise 20 degrees in just 10 minutes; so if it's 90 degrees outside, the interior of a car could reach well over 100 degrees in a short period of time. Leaving a window cracked or open will not be enough to combat this drastic rise in temperature. Head over to the CDC website to learn more about how to spot heat-related illnesses in children, as well as travel tips for travelling with kids and pets in hot weather. 

How Can You Attract New Customers to Your Retail Business?

By Staff
Monday, July 1, 2019 4:41 PM Gaining new customers is one of the most challenging aspects of retail. There are many different marketing strategies out there that you can use to attract new people to your business, but some are going to be more effective for you than others. Here are some of the top retail marketing strategies you can implement to bring in new customers and grow your business.

The 4 Ways Jony Ive Changed Apple, and With It, the Way We Feel About Tech

By Staff
Sunday, June 30, 2019 12:42 PM After Steve Jobs, there is no one more associated with the iconic design of Apple products than Jony Ive. Last week, however, Apple announced that the long-time design chief would be leaving to start his own firm, called LoveFrom. While the company said that Ive would continue to consult on future products, and that Apple would be LoveFrom's first customer, the news shocked the tech industry, and even sent Apple's stock falling over $9 billion in after-market trading. It's hard to overstate the influence that Ive has had on the design of Apple product, but even more importantly, the way technology products are designed. Here are four ways Ive's design changed both Apple, and as a result, the way we all feel about technology.

#National Sunglasses Day

By Staff
Thursday, June 27, 2019 4:28 PM Yesterday was #National Sunglasses Day and IMDb wants to know “What’s your favorite pair of iconic sunglasses from movies and TV? Click here for a look at some famous sunwear worn by stars on the big screen (films) and the little screen (TV). The commemorative holiday, which has garnered support and promotions from organizations, companies, practitioners and optical suppliers across the eyewear and eyecare industry, reminds consumers that wearing sunglasses is not only fashionable, but also a health necessity to protect the eyes from long- and short-term damage from the sun’s harsh UV rays. Click here to read more about it.

A Little Movement Can Go a Long Way

By Staff
Wednesday, June 26, 2019 2:35 PM Reading and learning about the adverse effects of a sedentary lifestyle can be daunting. The laundry list of sitting’s negative effects is enough to make even the most active person worry about the amount of time they spend on the couch. But, thankfully it’s not all bad news. Harvard Health recently reported that even brief periods of movement can reverse the harmful effects sitting has on our bodies. According to a 10-year-long study published in the American Journal of Epidemiology in January 2019, even small amounts of movement throughout the day seem to counteract at least some of bad effects of sitting. Light movement like vacuuming can make a big difference. Check out the full report from Harvard Health to learn all the details.

Five Ways AI Is Transforming Health Care

By Staff
Monday, June 24, 2019 5:36 PM AI is transforming the way we prevent, manage and treat illness in new ways. It will maximize efficiencies and harness an increasing volume of data and knowledge, but AI is different from human intelligence. It uses machines with algorithms to ingest and analyze complex data. What distinguishes AI technology from traditional techniques in health care is the ability to gain information and detect meaningful relationships in data sets—for actionable output. Health care organizations and payers are leveraging emerging technologies while also dealing with challenges like privacy, control of data, inequality and bias. Here’s a look at the top five AI health trends.

Cholesterol-Lowering Drugs Tied to Reduced Glaucoma Risk

By Staff
Monday, June 24, 2019 3:47 PM High cholesterol is associated with an increased risk of developing glaucoma, but a study suggests taking statins to lower cholesterol helps to reduce this risk. The study focused on the most common form of the disease, known as open-angle glaucoma, which starts with gradual loss of peripheral vision. Researchers followed more than 136,000 healthy adults for over a decade, starting when they were 40 and had no signs of glaucoma. By the end of the study, 886 glaucoma cases were diagnosed. People with any history of high cholesterol were 17 percent more likely to develop glaucoma, researchers report in JAMA Ophthalmology. And every 20 milligrams per deciliter of blood increase in total cholesterol was tied to a 7 percent increase in glaucoma risk. In contrast, any statin use was associated with a 15 percent lower risk of glaucoma overall, the study found. People who took statins for five or more years were 21 percent less likely to develop glaucoma than those who had never used the drugs. Click here to read the full story from The Washington Post.

Long Workdays Could Raise Your Stroke Risk

By Staff
Friday, June 21, 2019 11:04 AM Being first at the office and the last to leave may help get you that promotion, but new research warns that working long hours may not be so good for your heart. And the longer you do it, the higher your risk for a stroke, French researchers said. The findings come from a review of self-reported work habits and heart health among roughly 144,000 French men and women between the ages of 18 and 69. Those who worked long hours had a 29 percent greater risk of stroke, and those who worked long hours for at least 10 years had a 45 percent greater risk of stroke, the analysis found. For the purpose of the study, "long work hours" meant working more than 10 hours a day for at least 50 days out of the year. Click here to read the full story from WebMD.